A review of Peyton’s Promise. 21/06/2022.

In the summer of 1902 Peyton Quinn arrives at her new place of employment, as an upholsterer for the Emery’s. She discovers that her lifelong friend, Patrick is also employed there.

They have been friends since they were children and Patrick is keen to rekindle their friendship, hoping for something more, Peyton insists they should just be friends.

As they grow closer jealousy rears it’s ugly head and the work that Peyton is doing gets sabotaged.

The story is quaint and is interlaced with the Christian faith. Both characters have their faith tested and as the story develops you get a better understanding of how important faith is to them both.

The storyline is genteel, the characters typical of the time. The author has put a lot of work into her characters and they have depth to them.

I enjoyed reading this book, it felt lighthearted and refreshing, despite some characters only having a brief appearance.

I would recommend this book. It is predominantly aimed at a Christian audience but I believe anyone can enjoy this book.

This story highlights the struggles that females had in the early 20th century. It touches upon how women who believed in equality were accused of been radicals. Even those who believed in such a cause were frightened to speak up and show support for fear of reprisals.

I loved how their faith kept them moving forward and believing that a higher purpose was aiding them in their lives. That said, Peyton has a crisis of faith but circumstances see her turning to her faith once more for comfort.

There are other books in this serious but I haven’t read them yet. I do believe that you can read this as a stand-alone story.

Thoroughly enjoyable read and well crafted plot and characters. Five star rating for this quaint read.