Tuesday Thought – 06/04/21.

I’ve spent a fair amount of time nursing regret at what I should’ve done in my life. It just seeps into you at times, you don’t realise you’re holding on so tightly.

Realising that life is a gift and that the journey is also a gift made me stop and think about why I’m lugging regret around with me.

What does it serve?

Regret.

I’m talking about the regrets we have when we don’t take action in our lives, not the regrets we have when we’ve hurt someone.

There’s no reason why we can’t just aim for what we want our lives to be like, little by little. Just because we didn’t do that last week, or last year, or even five or ten years ago, that doesn’t mean we can’t still aim for that desire now.

There’s a saying that goes something like you’re a long time dead. Sobering thought. We may as well make good on what we want to do whilst we journey through this thing called life.

Tuesday Thought – 23/02/21.

I don’t know about you but since MRx ended, and here in the UK (well, England) we are starting to see an end to our latest lockdown, there’s a lighting of the load feeling.

In England we have had three lockdowns, you’d think we’d be used to the restrictions by now. But most people I have spoken to feel down, depressed even, and I think that’s because the last two lockdowns have been in the winter.

The first lockdown was March 2020 until the summer. It was a great spring in terms of good weather, and I believe that helped people, most people, cope with the restrictions. I didn’t fare so well then. I had a breakdown and ended up back on anti-depressants.

The next lockdown started early November and ended early December. The promise of Christmas spent with loved ones helped some people cope, but the the goalposts were changed on that and a lot of people slumped into the doldrums once more.

And no sooner had we started a new year – a year we hoped would be vastly different and have a lighter feel than the previous one – we were put into lockdown number three.

It’s no wonder people have struggled. It’s the darkest time of the year, the weather isn’t that great, and even when there was snow, we weren’t allowed to meet family or friends to have some fun.

But now the end is in sight. Vaccinations are being given, cases are decreasing, deaths are decreasing, there’s a way forward now that is tangible for us all.

The ending of Mercury Retrograde and the news of the easing of restrictions have given hope to us. The light is increasing, the spring is just around the corner and maybe, just maybe we can see our loved ones at Easter.

That hope is filling the air with a beautiful vibe that is touching everything it comes into contact with. It feels like a new beginning is upon us. It’s exciting and much anticipated.

The origins of Shrove Tuesday.

It’s Pancake Day here in the UK. As a child pancakes were something we ate in the run up to Easter, to herald the start of Lent. My family were fairly religious, so this was something we did partake in.

As an adult and someone who has practiced the craft for over 30 years, Pancake Day was acknowledged in my house as my children were fond of pancakes. The religious meaning behind the day had gone.

But did you know that the original celebration was a pagan festival?

The Slavs – a diverse group of tribal people, who lived throughout central and Eastern- Europe circa the 5th – 10th century – worshipped a God named Jarilo (I think it’s pronounced Yarilo). They believed that the changing of the season, from winter to spring, was a struggle between Jarilo, who was the God of vegetation, fertility and springtime, and the spirits of the cold and darkness.

They believed they had to help Jarilo win this struggle and this was a part of their spring celebration. The entire celebration lasted a week, with a large part of it making and eating pancakes. The hot, round pancakes symbolised the sun, and the Slavs believed that by eating the pancakes they would be imbued with the power, heat and warmth of the sun.

I think that is a wonderful and happy belief to have.

Tuesday Tip – 02/02/21.

As I said yesterday, February is all about love.

“In stillness, I find my centre and hear the messages meant for me.”

Stillness is an anchor that returns us to ourselves and our true path. Schedule a time to rest and be still. To sit for just a few minutes in stillness, breathing, being calm, letting life flow.

Notice how much time in stillness feels nourishing for you. Even for a few minutes being still and centring yourself can have a huge impact on your mental state.

This kind of activity he’s nourishing for your soul. Anything that is nourishing for your soul is Soul Love, self-love.

Being still and allowing thoughts and feelings to come and go allows you to anchor yourself. To ground yourself.

Be still. Be love.

Topic for Tuesday – 05/01/2021.

Here in England we have gone back into lockdown, which means our schools are remaining shut after the Christmas break. Once again parents, or grandparents, or carers, are being asked to don the teacher hat. The thing is, many parents and caregivers are unable to do this. There are a variety of reasons as to why they can’t and understandably they are angry at this latest closure of the nation’s schools. Not everyone is able to teach. Not everyone is able to step in and act as a teacher. Let’s face it, it’s a hell of a job to do; requiring patience, compassion, passion, a sense of humour, to name but a few of the attributes our teachers posses.

I home educated my younger daughter for her last year at senior school, and my son for his five years of senior school. It was hard work. It was exhausting. The difference is I chose to do it. I would be able to keep my own kids educated during this pandemic if they were still in school. But what about people like my younger daughter? Her daughter has special educational needs. How do you, an unqualified person, step in and educate a child who needs different lessons?

I believe schools are sending workbooks home and are insisting parents have their children do the work set out. But what about children who can’t do the work? What if the complex needs cannot be met at home? During the first national lockdown it was agreed that provisions would be made so that schools could remain open in the event of another major lockdown. It seems that hasn’t happened.

Enough with the political slant.

If you find yourself unable to help your child with their school work during the latest school closures you could try engaging their minds in a different way.

  • Research a topic that your child/children are interested in.
  • Read and review a favourite book – or a new book.
  • Check out YouTube for a craft activity, or any activity for that matter.
  • Check out BBC Bitesize. The resources they have are invaluable.
  • If able to do so go out into nature and take photos.
  • Learn about your local area.
  • Go on a treasure hunt. Even at this time of the year there are plenty of items you can collect.
  • Watch movies and write reviews.

The law states that a child has a right to a suitable education. This law requires that a child receives an education that is suitable to their needs. During these unprecedented times the educational laws should reflect that not all caregivers are able to provide the education that a school can provide. Therefore any caregiver who has not been able to get their child to do the work their school has sent home should not be berated by school for having their child/children engage in other educational activities.

We keep hearing the slogan “We are all in this together” and maybe we are. But we must remember that these fast-moving changes affect our children too. Uncertainty can make them anxious so the last thing they need is to be fretting about work they cannot do.