Review of A Forged Affair by MaryAnn Clark

forged-affair

 

I started reading this book aware that it is part of a series, but it is easy to read as a standalone book. To begin with I found the pace of the storyline quite slow, the author’s illuminative writing allowed me to picture the area of France that the book is set in, but at first I felt swamped by this.

Sticking with the story I found that after I had the first chapter under my belt the storyline opened up a lot more, the characters started to flow a lot more freely and I began to get a feel for them.

At first I wasn’t sure if I liked the protagonist, she came across as cocky. I soon learnt that this showing off that Niki was doing was a mask to hide her pain, and that warmed me to her.

Niki’s relationship with Didier was uncomplicated at first, her desire to help him out was really endearing. Her need to stand up to the bullies on his behalf really won me over. Her relationship with Luc was really complicated and this had me very frustrated right the way through the book. That said, the complications were as a result of her pain and therefore quite understandable.

During the first chapter, when I felt the story was slow, I was really certain I was not going to enjoy this book. After about the third or fourth chapter I found that the emotions of all concerned had got me gripped, I have to admit that this did surprise me.

The author has carefully woven a rather surprising story of love, friendships, heartache and an utterly independent woman who you will find endearing but frustratingly stubborn at the same time.

Her descriptive account of the area really helps to set the scene for this story. The characters are both likeable and believable, although some of the background characters lacked dimension at times. That said, this did not take anything away from the storyline, nor did it interfere with the flow of the story.

I found this book enjoyable and thought provoking. Niki’s character caused me to ponder what it would be like for a young female to be travelling around France and then to dive headfirst into a friendship with a man she has just met.

I enjoyed the author’s writing style, her knowledge about the area of France that the book is set in and the activities that the characters are involved in comes across very well. I would definitely recommend this book to family and friends.

Review of When Polly Met Olly.

I fully expected this book to be heavy on the romance. Why wouldn’t it be, it is a romance novel after all. I was pleasantly surprised to find the romance was not over loaded and that the wit and humour the main character oozes is what drives this story forward.

Polly lands a job at To The Moon And Back dating agency. She’s actually a photographer, but not landing any lucrative commissions has meant she’s had to take jobs that aren’t anything remotely to do with photography in order to get by.

Derek, her boss, is a sweet guy and when he asks Polly to pretend to be a potential client for one of his business rivals in order to better understand the competition, Polly wants to do her best for him. But when she actually meets Olly, the owner of Elite Love Match there’s a connection between them, leaving Polly feeling a little disconcerted by the obvious chemistry that was sparking between them.

When Polly Met Olly was a lovely read. It wasn’t too heavy on the romance, despite it being set around a dating agency. Polly is the kind of character that you warm to straight away. She’s clever, witty, humble, and genuinely wants to do her best for everyone she’s involved with, in whatever capacity.

The story takes a little while until we see the blossoming of romance between Polly and Olly, but to me, that felt like the right thing. It allowed the background story to tell itself, without the writer having to add bits on here and there for the reader to make sense of what’s happening. The story flows well and the characters all work well together too.

A well written, witty romance novel that doesn’t drown the reader with love and romance.

Highly recommended.

Review of End Of The Line.

I read this book in a day. Once I picked it up I couldn’t stop. The storyline pulled me in deeper and deeper, my need to find out what would happen next driving me onwards.

The End Of The Line is a thrilling tale of magic and the depths people will go to in order to harness the raw power of it, even summoning a demon. But for Amanda Coleman magic is the root of all evil. Her father was a powerful Abra – the name given to powerful, magical practitioners- he used his power to get what he wanted, both for himself and others, by using Amanda and her mother’s blood to enhance his abilities. But one day Amanda snapped and killed him, earning her the legendary title of Abra killer.

Amanda and her associates are con artists and they go on heists for their criminal boss, but when he dies and a younger newcomer takes over the gang the crew are hired to trap a demon and banish it in a remote part of Siberia. The cost of doing so will take everything they have, including the lives of their loved ones.

Well worth a read. Highly recommended.

The Signature Of All Things.

The Signature Of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert.

I think the first I need to say about this book is that it is very well written, which is not too surprising given Elizabeth Gilbert is the author.  I expected something along the lines of Eat, Pray, Love,  but got something entirely different.  I suppose I assumed that this author was typecast and I never really thought of her writing anything remotely different to that book.  But this book, The Signature Of All Things is so different and I believe different in a very good way.

The book follows the life of Alma Whittaker and it is very heavy on botanical terminology.  When I first realised this I did wonder if I would see the book through, it is very long and not particularly gripping.  I do believe, however, that the author’s creativity draws us in and we cannot help but read on, wanting to know what happens next.

I would not go as far as to say this is a riveting read, although it is an enjoyable tale nevertheless.  It certainly is no hearts-and-flowers-love-story, which is very much my cup of tea, but it is an enjoyable read that you will want to see through to the end.  I don’t think it is big on drama, although there are fascinating tales within this book that I found enjoyable – tales from other characters that Alma encounters.

If you enjoy the work of this author then you absolutely have to read this book.  If you are looking for something similar to Gilbert’s best-selling novel you certainly won’t find it here in this book.  The book is very different form her most popular book and that in itself is a good thing.

Recommended.

**** 4 stars.

Review Of House At The End Of Hope Street.

 

 

 


This book was awesome. I loved it.

 

The book centres on Alba who we meet right at the very beginning of the book. Alba is in a dark place and is wandering aimlessly around Cambridge one night when she suddenly finds herself outside of number eleven Hope Street. She is very puzzled as she has never encountered the house before, although she is certain she has been this way countless times. There is something about the house that draws her to it, draws her up the garden path and up to the front door where she finds herself knocking on the door. She is let in without hesitation by a woman named Peggy. It soon becomes apparent to Alba that this is no ordinary House. There is something uniquely special about it. Alba, along with the other women who are staying at Hope Street, is nudged in the right direction when it comes to finding out the truth about her life and the choices she needs to make.

The book is a delight to read. It has a fantastic array of famous characters in it all more than willing to give advice to the women who stay at Hope Street. I found that the book was well written and easy to enjoy. It had all of my favourite ingredients – hope, love, joy and a happy ending.

 

I would highly recommend this book and am happy to give it a five star plus rating.

 

*****+

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED READ.

Review Of Head Over Heels

Magee Sinclair works for the family advertising agency and is set to take over the helm once her father retires.  Recently though, she just cannot get anything right.  Desperate to prove she is not a screw up she is relieved when she lands a contract, a contract she believes will save her career.  There is only one problem though, when she met with Justin Kane, the owner of a bike shop.  Justin hopes to expand his bike shop and Magee promised him she was the right person for the job.  But she had to tell a lie to get him to agree to use her family’s advertising agency.

What could possibly go wrong?

When Justin’s girlfriend dumps him just before the client he is trying to woo flies into the country, he finds himself turning to Magee to help him out of a bind.  After all, she has as much to lose as he does if the client does not invest in his company.  Justin needs a temporary girlfriend, a woman who told him she loved mountain biking as much as he did.

When Justin approaches Magee asking her to be his stand in girlfriend, outlining what the weekend will entail, she cannot believe that her small, white lie has come back to haunt her in such a way.  But, believing she can pull the whole pretend girlfriend gig off without anyone being any the wiser, she agrees.

This is a very fast paced read, but really enjoyable all the same.  It is not difficult keeping up with the plot.  You know its going to go wrong eventually.

Magee is a very likable character and you find yourself willing everything to work out for her and Justin, especially when Tina, Justin’s ex, turns up causing a scene and threatening to expose the lie.

An excellent read.

Recommended.

5 stars *****

Review of A Bad Boy Is Good To Find

New York heiress Lizzie Hathaway is not quite the media babe you might expect her to be, she is anything but.  This does not bother her though, she thinks she is the luckiest woman alive as she has found her dream man in Conroy Beale, a man she believes is every bit as rich as she is.  Conroy makes her feel good about herself, she isn’t exactly the typical heiress type and is lacking in confidence when it comes to her appearance and personal life.  That Conroy chose her has her walking on cloud nine, and when he proposes to her she feels like the luckiest woman alive.

  But then her whole world comes crashing down around her in spectacular style.  Her father is arrested for fraud after he has embezzled all of Lizzie’s inheritance and then she finds out that Conroy is not the man he claims to be.  Lizzie is devastated, firstly she has to endure the very public scandal surrounding her father and then she discovers that Conroy is not the rich tycoon he told her he was, instead he is a mechanic with no money.  Believing that Conroy does not really love her, and that all he was truly after was her money, Lizzie spirals out of control.

  But Conroy truly does love her and now he must prove that he is not just out for what he get out of her.  In order to this he kidnaps Lizzie and then allows himself to be dragged back to the Bayou where he hails from.  Lizzie believes she has conned Conroy into marrying her – exclusively filmed by her scheming cousin who works for a TV company.  What she does not bank on are her growing feelings for the man she believes has duped her.

Loved this book!

 From the moment I began reading this book I was totally hooked.  I loved the characters, the plot and the ending was fantastic.  I loved the concept, loved how the guy was poor for a change.  I loved how everything went belly up and the woman acted bad and the guy was the one trying to put everything right.

Excellent read!
 
I would definitely recommend this book.
 
5 stars *****

Review Of A Faded Cottage

Review of A Faded Cottage.

Quaid Witherspoon’s life is turned upside down when he becomes ill and is unable to continue with his painting. Quaid is a very rich man and has always had everything that money can buy. One summer, during his teens, he met Sandy and fell fast and hard for her, but his family were less than impressed with his choice of girlfriend. Like the dutiful son Quiad did as his parents bid and married a dutiful, rich girl more suited to their lifestyle than someone like Sandy.

Fast forward thirty years and Quaid has returned to the place where he and Sandy first met. He is living a quiet life now, away from prying eyes, out of the public eye where he can avoid the pitying stares of his many fans, friends and family, along with the media and general public. Quaid is a critically acclaimed artist but since his illness he has not been able to hold a paint brush. He cannot stand the pity he receives from others so he goes away to Hathaway Cove to avoid the public eye.

The story centres around two weeks of Quaid’s life; the two weeks around Christmas time. Sandy turns up and their relationship springs back to life, much to the delight of Quaid. But Sandy is hiding something from him, a secret she fears will take him away from her again.

When I first started reading this book I actually thought I was not going to enjoy the story. It took me a little while to get into it, but then I found I was enjoying the story and became easily engrossed in it. Towards the end of the book I felt the story became rushed, and I did not enjoy that. For me, it spoilt the story somewhat; given that the story had romantic overtones I felt leaving the reader guessing would have been a much nicer ending, rather than the methodical tidying up of loose ends.

Overall the story was slow to start and the ending was less than satisfactory, in my opinion. That said, the main bulk of the story was well written and a pretty good read.

3 stars ***

 

Review Of Bristol House

 Annie Kendall is a recovering alcoholic who has come to London, from the USA to revive her career. Annie is an architectural historian and the Shalom Foundation, headed by Philip ~Weinraub, has head-hunted her to work for them. The brief is to locate several pieces of Judaica – historical items significant to the Jewish faith – rumoured to have been gifted by a mystery man known as the Jew Of Holborn. Annie isn’t certain that such a figure actually existed, he was said to be around during Henry VIII’s reign and as this was a particularly unsettled religious time, especially for Jews, it seems unlikely that such a man would have been open about his beliefs, let alone lavish the religious artefacts upon the chosen people.

But Annie is keen to reignite her career and what better way than to prove that the Jew Of Holborn is more than a myth but also to find his missing treasures. Her flight and accommodation are arranged by the Shalom Foundation, she is to stay in an appartment in Bristol House for the duration of her trip. The owner is going away for a while and her niece, in the employ of the Shalom Foundation, arranges for her to rent the appartment whilst her Aunt is away. Before she takes possession of the appartment she is instructed by the owner to take an inventory of the furniture and items of art etc that are in the flat. It is while she is doing this that she encounters a monk. The puzzling fact is that he is a Carthusian monk and definitely not from this era.

At first Annie is a little spooked by these events but pretty soon she finds herself engrossed in her research which accidentally introduces her to Geoff Harris, a TV celebrity, renowned for his investigative journalism and his current affairs show. Of course Annie has no idea who he is but she warms to him immediately.

Throughout the book we are subjected to Annie’s history, her remorse for her actions in the past, her enthusiasm for her research and her keen sense of something not being right about the whole gig she has signed herself up to. With the help of Geoff and his mother and her friend they uncover some startling revelations about the Tudor past and th Jew Of Holborn, with a link to the present day. They also uncover a plot by Philip Weinraub to wreak havoc within the Catholic church and right in the midst of Rome itself.

The book is a pleasant read, plenty of action and suspense to keep the reader hooked from start to finsih. The suspense at the end of the book is quite thrilling, ensuring the reader stays with the story right until the end.

I thoroughly enjoyed this book and would recommend it to everyone. It has something for everyone, from mystery to romance and loads of history thrown into the mix too.

My rating for the Bristol House is 5 stars *****

Excellent!!!